Lucien Dugaz

My passion for the literature of the 15th and 16th centuries was born during a Master’s degree in Medieval Studies completed between 2013 and 2015 (Paris 3 / Paris 4 / ENS Ulm / École nationale des chartes). I then discovered a poet on whom I am still working today, Octovien de Saint-Gelais (1468-1502). I learned the rudiments of philology by editing the beginning of his translation in decasyllables of the Aeneid, which is the first translation of Virgil’s masterpiece into French. Thanks to a LabEx Hastec postdoc at the École des chartes (2021-2022), I have since been able to complete an extensive digital edition of this very long text that will be published in 2023 (https://labexhastec.ephe.psl.eu/2021/07/06/laureats-des-6-contrats-post-doctoraux-2021-2022/).

Between 2015 and 2019, I devoted my doctoral thesis to Christine de Pizan, under the supervision of Gabriella Parussa (Paris 3). I edited a very surprising and little known text of the famous author, her Livre des fais d’armes et de chevalerie, which I published in 2021 (https://classiques-garnier.com/le-livre-des-fais-d-armes-et-de-chevalerie.html). Doctor in Linguistics since June 2019, I then pursued research that exploits the text editions I produce by crossing different approaches: literature, philology, lexicology and stylistics.

In parallel to my activities as a teacher of Old French, medieval literature and language sciences in several universities (Paris 3, Toulon, Mayotte), I continue to edit texts, often unpublished, from the 15th and 16th centuries: Christine de Pizan (anthology of lyrical and narrative texts edited with Sarah Delale for the Livre de poche, coll. Lettres gothiques, forthcoming), Octovien de Saint-Gelais (Complainte et Epitaphe de Charles VIII, https://hal.science/hal-03909350v1), and finally André de la Vigne and Jean d’Auton for the Médialittérature project (see the tab “Recueillir la poésie d’actualité”).

In this way, I hope to bring back to their readers little-read or even completely unknown authors, to give them a voice and to enrich our knowledge of the literature of the 15th and 16th centuries.